Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Picture a World without Picture Books

 Can this article be true? The New York Times is reporting here that the popularity of picture books is diminishing and that more younger children are reading chapter books. Sad but not surprising once you factor in the rising pressure of younger children to be more advanced in their studies by Kindergarten. I think we'll still be a picture book pushing family. I have really, really enjoyed the books we've been reading with/to Nate. It's almost like having a second childhood -- for example, I only discovered Don Freeman's gem, Corduroy, this year (I know, what rock have I been hiding under?!).  What is your favorite picture book?

5 comments:

Crystal said...

Corduroy was and still is by far my favorite picture book!

Crystal said...

http://kids.nypl.org/reading/recommended2.cfm?ListID=61 has the top 100 picture books and there's actually quite a few on here that are awesome and I loved as a kid! I think kids today should not be made to or pushed to read chapter books and rather enjoy what us as kids got to enjoy.

Jen said...

Well, Avery has been kind of slow when it comes to books. She just hasn't seem interested- up until now. I just scored a huge lot of gently used board books and she has really enjoyed flipping through them and looking at the pictures. She will even make up her own little story as she turns the pages. We have no idea what she's saying, but it's fun to see her imagination working even at such a young age.

lindybasenji said...

First, the NYT article has been proven to have flawed research. Luckily! They took quotes and facts out of context, but don't expect them to admit that . . . do your own research as you need to.

Second, parents who pay attention will realize that the vocabulary in picture books stimulates the mind as it is meant for an adult to read and enriches the child's ability to succeed in school in areas such as vocabulary portions of standardized tests. The illustrations also enable the child to experience multi-sensory learning which also enriches the child's ability to succeed in school. So the parent is doing a better thing by keeping picture books around for both younger and older readers, even after the child starts reading "chapter books" . . .

Third, seriously? What rock have you been living under?? Do you need my list of top 50 classic picture books (remember, I do have some experience in the field)? http://lindybasenji.typepad.com/not_living_vicariously/2007/01/kids_need_books.html If you want my new favorites . . . let me know.

hugs from your friendly children's librarian to all the kids in your life!

Anonymous said...

I have been in the process of trying to narrow down our collection of books--they are taking over our house and garage! But, I cannot part with my kids picture books--not only do they have beautiful illustrations, they are wonderful stories that bring back so many great memories.Jennifer